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237.131 Conversations in Creative Cultures 237.131 Studio Notes Bachelor of Fine Arts

237.131 – Week #12 Notes

Asian Aotearoa Histories

Pre-work – videos

“Māori-Chinese encounters and New Zealand multi-cultural society”. Manying Ip. Research works wonders. 2011, Auckland University.

Interviewed 100+ people.

Lots of NZ people with Chinese and Māori.

Multi-cultural society is broader than people think.

Needs to be more understanding of Asian community in NZ.

“Documentary Edge Online Video Poetry Slam 2012: Chinglish: Renee Liang”. 2012, Documentary Edge.

People’s perceptions that people who are Asian were not born here?

“Your English is good, for a foreigner…”

“Community arts case study: ‘Alice Canton’s OTHER [CHINESE]’”. Jeff Smith, Deep Animation (filmmakers). 2018, New Zealand on Air.

Classroom notes

Economic downturn in China.

Prompted a diaspora to other countries.

Watching video #1 again

Social deprivation.

Legislative discrimination.

Inter-marriage.

This was one of first pieces of research.

Way forwards is for Chinese and Maori to work together.

National identity includes Pakeha, Māori, and Asians.

Reflecting on this image

Portrayal of Asian man as a monster.

Male attacker.

Māori woman representing NZ?

Māori as victims?

Adaptation of other country’s racist traits.

Insecurity?

Why opium? Was that long dead by 1907?

Why octopus?

https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1018&context=cola_ug_research


https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/archived/nationalinterest/chinese-octopus/3075324

https://streetsofsalem.com/2013/01/22/teaching-with-tentacles/
From georgiana morison to Me: (Direct Message) 02:01 PM

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213.157 Studio I (Art Lab) 213.157 Studio Notes Bachelor of Fine Arts

213.157 – Session #12.2 Notes

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213.157 Studio I (Art Lab) 213.157 Studio Notes Bachelor of Fine Arts

213.157 – Session #12.1 Notes

Experiment

Testing out a few concepts…

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237.131 Conversations in Creative Cultures 237.131 Studio Notes Bachelor of Fine Arts

237.131 – Week #11 Notes

Locating Moana Oceania

Dawn Raids Documentary

https://www.nzonscreen.com/title/dawn-raids-2005/overview

Quotes

The dawn raids were shameful, because in essence they set out to pick up anybody who didn’t look like a Pākehā or palangi New Zealander. They swooped on people who were Māori, they swooped on many Pasifika people who had absolutely lawful residence in New Zealand, may even have been born here…

Helen Clark


It was a painful time to be a Pacific Islander in New Zealand. I don’t think it’s something we should hide from.

Oscar Kightley in Sunday Star Times, 31 July 2005


The police proposed that they would simply stop people in the street and ask them for their documentation – hello, what is this? South Africa? Pass laws, you’ve got to carry your passport to prove you’re a Kiwi. I don’t think they meant to be so offensive, but it was wierd.

Ex Minister of Immigration Aussie Malcolm


Statistics show that through the 70s and the 1980s, that the bulk of overstayers in New Zealand were actually from Europe and from North America, but they weren’t targeted to anything like the same extent.

Massey University Professor Paul Spoonley


…Very much was made of the word ‘dawn raids’. It’s very emotive. Just remember — these young fellas were working in the freezing works, heading off to work at five and six in the morning. They were on long shifts and so on, and that was the only time you could get them.

Former Police Task Force Commander Ross Dallow

Thoughts on this

Given that the Government has issued a formal apology, it’s clear that this was a shameful episode in NZ history.

Don’t doubt that there was overstaying or breaches of immigration conditions, but the response to this was in no way proportional, and went as far in some cases to become a fundamental violation of human rights.

Stop and search – comparison to “pass laws” in South Africa under Apartheid are not unjustified.

Oceania / Pacific Island

Select 1 or 2 Conversation points

  1. What do you know about the current concerns of the communities of the Pacific Island groups? A couple of options are below
    a. Use google to find out about Banaba and Bikini islands both forsaken for economic or/an political power. Discuss what you found out.
    b. Provide examples like the impacts of climate crisis and reflect on Hauofa’s point about kaitiaki roles,
  2. If someone asked you what is a Pacific Islander? What would you say? Would you say that is you?
    a. Discuss, why
    b. Or would you not? & discuss why not?
  3. Discuss what you know about the Pacific
    a. Who lives there
    b. Its expanse
    c. Its history
  4. How heard is the voice of the Pacific Island identity (beyond NZ) in terms of political & economic power – internationally or even within Oceania? Discuss your ideas.
  5. Do you listen to Pacific Rapp? Why and what does it say to you?

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237.131 Conversations in Creative Cultures 237.131 Studio Notes Bachelor of Fine Arts

237.131 – Week #10 Notes

Decolonising gender and sexuality

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213.157 Studio I (Art Lab) 213.157 Studio Notes Bachelor of Fine Arts

213.157 – Session #11.2 Notes

Group discussion

Thinking about how we might evolve our work.

Sounds like we all need to do some experimentation.

Only two weeks left to get to a completed work…

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213.157 Studio I (Art Lab) 213.157 Studio Notes Bachelor of Fine Arts

213.157 – Session #11.1 Notes – Gallery Visit

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213.157 Studio I (Art Lab) 213.157 Studio Notes Bachelor of Fine Arts

213.157 – Session #10.2 Notes – Formative

Wiki tekau, Akomanga tua rua

Formative Assessment

Notes on my own work

What has worked for you? What was your best, or favorite, method? 

Deeply layered collage is a messy, fun thing to do and I can see it having interesting possibilities that I’m already thinking through.

I like the idea of using a string/rope to pull through layers of paper. I’m interested to try a more fine grained approach. Perhaps apply a layer of colour, add drawings of people on newsprint on top, then use thin strings to pull through them aligned to the limbs, so that you get a kind of sinewy effect? Worth trying.

How could these methods reflect aspects of hakari through the resulting artworks? 

I quite like the richness and deliberate nature of this technique, although it is destructive in nature. Hakari can be partly about displaying wealth, almost in a gratuitous way.

Why?

As to hākari, I can see a link here. A feeling that I’m adding richness to a work that’s ultimately then something of a sacrifice.

Note: I’ve no idea why I’m making this connection, but it does remind me of some Native American blood rituals. It’s the tearing through of something as the final act in the process. Probably an old movie called A Man Called Horse, which is a mixed up mess of a thing with a white guy playing the Native American lead, the ritual aspects borrowed from the wrong tribe, and so on.

How will you iterate on your earlier experiments to produce a
final artwork?

What research and further experimentation will be needed?

How will you go about this?

While making in this way, I did have a number of things that I wasn’t entirely happy with, and also places where I wanted to try additional techniques:

I did not have much control over what was exposed on underlying layers. I think with my next piece this should be more deliberate.
Adding the string/rope back into the piece is what Bradford discussed in one of the interviews we watched. How might I do that?

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213.157 Studio I (Art Lab) 213.157 Studio Notes Bachelor of Fine Arts

213.157 – Session #10.1 Notes

Wiki tekau, Akomanga tua tahi

Group discussion

Sadly, I was the only person in my group who had time at the weekend to do anything.

7. Mark Bradford

Uses found materials.

Brings social and cultural issues into his work.

Grew up in what could be thought of as a matriarchal collective.

Initially worked in his mother’s hair salon.

Worked with hair papers – cheap, available.

Wants to keep the story complicated – no simplifications.

Works based on maps

Gotta admire the use of a planer!

Acknowledgment of people’s struggles – no turning away.

Abstract, but comes from material that’s “politically and socially charged”.

Builds on what’s been done before.

Constant learning and experimentation.

Builds time for experimenting into his life. 80/20 or 70/30: 20-30% time for experimentation.

Riots changed the physicality of his work and found items.

Dedicates time to giving back to his community.

Contemporary art for everyone – inviting the community to work with him.

“Hard won hope”

Artists deserving of a seat at the table.

“Don’t ask; demand.”

“I pillage my own work. I tear it down and build it up in traces.”

What do we know about Mark Bradford’s materials, methods, and processes?

“I pillage my own work. I tear it down and build it up in traces.”

Uses found materials. Urban materials

Worked with hair papers – cheap, available.

Wants to keep the story complicated – no simplifications.

Works based on maps

Gotta admire the use of a planer!

Builds on what’s been done before.

Constant learning and experimentation.

Builds time for experimenting into his life. 80/20 or 70/30: 20-30% time for experimentation.

“Necessity makes invention.”

Experimental

Layers

Abstract

Reductive(?) artmaking, creating by removing. (e.g sanding art gallery wall, tearing paper)

Gave himself permission to follow his voice, with no compromise

How do these relate to community and cultural context?

Brings social and cultural issues into his work.

Grew up in what could be thought of as a matriarchal collective.

Initially worked in his mother’s hair salon.

Acknowledgment of people’s struggles – no turning away.

Abstract, but comes from material that’s “politically and socially charged”.

Riots changed the physicality of his work and found items.

1980’s aids epidemic. Experienced as a gay youth in Los Angeles

Working with the community to help foster youth, feeding his success back to help his community

How material such as merchant posters suggest a timeline in culture

Contemporary art is for everyone, so you have to address access and need in your culture

“I don’t think strong ideas ever come through the front door.”

Taking remnants of our history and environment and trying to recompose and rebuild

How do all of these things connect and contribute to the ideas in the work?

Dedicates time to giving back to his community.

Contemporary art for everyone – inviting the community to work with him.

“Hard won hope”

Artists deserving of a seat at the table.

Use success in the market to give back, to help the disaffected youth, give them a sense of purpose through self expression

His work is externally optimistic and hopeful

“Don’t ask; demand.”

Work reflects the social issues of the neighbourhood as time has progressed

8. Haegue Yang

What do we know about Haegue Yang’s materials, methods, and processes?

Use of off the shelf parts, e.g window blinds, planters, lights, racks.

Crochet/Knitting

Diverse media

Geometry, abstractions, light and shadow

Movement

Particularly interested in the sphere as a burst of energy – a circular movement that doesn’t go anywhere

Sound to support from the background

Imaginary

How do these relate to community and cultural context?

Takes advantage of being in a gallery.

Elaborates on hidden meaning in mundane objects/experiences

Spatial/Temporal journey

Provoking imagination of the future

Interested in movement in multiple dimensions:

Physical movement

Emotional movement

Social and political movement

Mental and abstract movement

How do all of these things connect and contribute to the ideas in the work?

Geometry, abstract, light, shadow

Provoke thinking and abstractions

Focuses on marginal experiences and elaborates on them

Interestested in the multidimensionality of movement: physical, political, social.

Interested in the politics in the boring nature of objects

Focuses on experiences that are marginal and peripheral as these experiences are full of poetic possibilities

Using the space as more of a medium rather than just a space that focuses the attention on the work, active negative space

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237.131 Conversations in Creative Cultures 237.131 Studio Notes Bachelor of Fine Arts

237.131 – Week #9 Notes

Te Tiriti o Waitangi and Art & Design

Guarding the Family Silver

Cognitive dissonance – keep te reo Māori on the marae, but celebtrate the “All Blacks haka”.

Māori culture potentially seen by big brands as a resource to be exploited.

Struggling to say how this is different from a rap artist remixing another track.

Offense should be measured by the standards of the culture.

“Can’t celebrate the beauty without celebrating the people to which it belongs”.

How to check if offending Māori cultural images?

IP system does not current support collective ownership approaches.

How to resolve the “total incompatibility” between the individualistic approaches to global IP and collectivism of Māori tikanga considerations.

“Control” seems to be the critical issue. Control of identity, etc.

Not a good fit between IP and traditional knowledge.

Māori recognitions of protection – have IP law recognize those interests.

How to address the potential “chilling effect” on innovation? For example, will the international innovators shy away from NZ?